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High School Programme Overview

Arabic A

Overview

We deliver Arabic Language following the Ministry of Education standards, in line with Middle Years Program vision. This encourages students to become creative, critical and reflective thinkers. We encourage students to make connections between their studies in traditional subjects and the modern world; fostering the 21st Century Skills that include critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication.

Years 7-9

The curriculum is aiming to develop students’ attainment in all language skills, such as listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting in a variety of contexts; by applying linguistic and literary concepts and skills in a variety of authentic contexts (including stories and informational reports). In addition to engaging with text from different historical periods and a variety of cultures, in order to enrich their knowledge, vocabularies, eloquence taste, to use language as a vehicle for thought, creativity, reflection, learning, self-expression, analysis and social interaction, and to develop a lifelong interest in reading.

We are aiming to achieve that through different activities inside the classroom and outside, to match students’ needs and suit their desires, and explore language through a variety of media and modes.

Years 10 and 11

In this stage the curriculum is continuing in achieving its aims depending on Ministry of Education standards, in line with MYP (Arabic 1st language).

At this level there are more chances to develop critical, creative and personal approaches to studying and analyzing literary and non-literary text; in addition to explore and analyze aspects of personal, and other cultures through variety of contexts. This will lead to supporting their learning skills and project performance.

Years 12 & 13

The curriculum in this final stage is still depending on MoE standards; in line with International Baccalaureate program.

The curriculum is aiming to make our students to be lifelong learners, the course is supported in ways that are consistent with the IB learner profile and the pedagogical principles that underpin the IB programs: the promotion of critical- and creative thinking skills, and learning how to learn.

Using the digital and documented resources to carry out human and social studies and research on problems related to the environment and society; in addition to addressing some of the global environmental issues. Such as: Communication and media, Global issues, Social relationships, Cultural diversity, Customs and traditions, Health, Leisure, Science and Technology.

Arabic First Language Assessment:

Assessment for classes 7 – 13 are designed to achieve the general objectives and skills that are relevant to the MOE Standards. The formative assessment is applied to grades 7-13 according to modern assessment strategies throughout the three terms. The summative assessments of the first and second terms include the skills acquired by the student during the semester, while the end-of-year assessment includes the skills acquired by the students during the year.


Term and assessments weights:

Year

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Project or research

7-9

30%

30%

30%

10%

10-11

30%

30%

40%

The project grade is included in the term final grade.

12-13

25%

25%

50%

The MOE assessment system applied in the department prepares students for the MYP e-assessment by the end of year 11, and for the DP exam by the end of year 13.

Department of Business & Economics

IBDP Business

The business management course is designed to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of business management theories, as well as their ability to apply a range of tools and techniques.

Students learn to analyse, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels. The course covers a range of organizations from all sectors, as well as the socio-cultural and economic contexts in which those organizations operate.

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed via two external examinations and an internal assessment that is externally moderated by the IB

 

IBDP Economics

The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a dynamic social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.

The course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum—rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed via 2 external examinations for SL and three external examinations at HL. In addition to this students are required to submit 3 internal assessments which are externally moderated,

Individuals and Societies Overview (Geography, History, Integrated Humanities, Psychology)

Aims of the Department: In the Individuals and Societies Department, our aim is to develop inquiring, analytical, evaluative and conscious minds, through thought provoking tasks, assessments, debates, and Socratics.  Our classrooms are cooperative learning environments where diplomacy, personal responsibility and leadership naturally thrive. 

Service in Action: Within the Individuals and Societies Department, students are continuously challenged to become involved in the community through links developed in the curriculum.  These opportunities involve Charitable Endeavours, Humanities Week, various workshops with outside agencies. 

Curriculum Overview: In Geography, students are given opportunities to explore the natural, social and economic worlds around them, providing an understanding of our world both locally and globally. 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

MYP Year 1

How do I fit into Geography and Why do we live where we live?

Global context: identities and relationships

Key concept: identity

Weather and our lives and Earth science

 Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: systems

Mapping our world and extreme places

Global context: orientation in space and time

Key concept: time place and space

MYP Year 2

Controlling the floods. Is the grass always greener on the other side?

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: change

You are what you eat, from farm to fork.

 Global context: globalization and sustainability

Key concept: global interaction

 

Tourism

Global context: globalization and sustainability

Key concept: change

 

MYP Year 3

How can we reach equilibrium in unique spaces?

Global context: globalization and sustainability

Key concept: change

 

Coastal environments, who wants to live beside the sea?

Global context: orientation in space and time

Key concept: time place and space

A brave new world

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: systems

MYP Year 4

What makes a city?

Global context: orientation in space and time

Key concept: time place and space

Impact and management of natural disasters

Global context: orientation in space and time

Key concept: time place and space

Living in a hazardous world

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: time, place and space

MYP

Year 5

Global development

Global context: fairness and development

Key context: global interaction

Demographics and human movement

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: change

Atmosphere, weather and climate

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: systems

DP Year 1

Paper 1- Populations in Transition

Paper 2-Geography of food and health

Paper 1- Disparities in Wealth and Development

Paper 2- Oceans and their coastal margins

Paper 1- Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability

 

DP Year 2

Paper 1- Patterns in Resource Consumption

Paper 2- Geography of Food and Health/Leisure, sport and Tourism

Paper 2- Leisure, sport and tourism

Paper 3- measuring global interaction, changing spaces, economic interactions and flows, environmental change, sociocultural exchanges, political outcomes, global interactions at the local level

 

Curriculum Overview: In History, students are given opportunities to explore historic perspectives, and attitudes.  This is done through the development of historic skills like bias, source analysis for origin, purpose and limitations, and historiography.

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

MYP Year 1

Why have our everyday lives changes over the past century?

Global context: Globalization and sustainability

Key concept: change

 

Can individuals make a difference in shaping the world?

Global context: Identities and relationships

Key concept: global interaction

Do social, cultural and artistic movements reflect the era in which they take place?

Global context: personal and cultural expression

Key concept: time, place and space

MYP Year 2

How revolutionary was the industrial revolution?

Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: change

What impact have pioneers, innovators and developers had on societies?

Global context: fairness and development

Key concept: global interaction

 

Does trade and exchange promote cooperation or lead to exploitation?

Global context: orientation in space and time

Key concept: time place and space

MYP Year 3

Why do nations go to war?

Global context: globalization and sustainability

Key concept: global interactions

 

Why do nations build empires and form supra- national alliances?

Global context: Identities and relationships

Key concept: systems

What are the consequences of inaction?

Global context: fairness and development

Key concept: global interaction

 

 

MYP Year 4

Why have national movements been successful

Global context: Identities and relationships

Key concept: time, place and space

 

 How have civil rights and social protest groups brought about change?

 Global context: fairness and development

Key concept: change

 

How have ideas reflected change over the past 200 years?

Global context: Identities and relationships

Key concept: change

 

 

MYP Year 5

Why have our everyday lives changed over the past 200 years?

 Global context: scientific and technological innovation

Key concept: change

How has health and medicine improved over time?

 Global context: fairness and development

Key concept: systems

 

Superpowers and e-asseement revision

 Global context: Identities and relationships

Key concept: global interaction

DP Year 1

Paper 1: Rights and Protest- USA and South Africa

Paper 2: Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states

DP Year 2

Paper 2:The Cold War

Paper 3: Aspects of the history of Europe

 

Curriculum Overview: In Psychology, students are given opportunities to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied.  This allows students a greater understanding of themselves and human behaviour.  This is done through the study of biological, cognitive, and sociocultural influences on behaviour. 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

DP Year 1

Intro to Psychology

Biological Level  of Analysis

Socio-Cultural  Level  of Analysis

Cognitive l Level of Analysis

Internal Assessment

DP Year 2

Abnormal Psychology

Qualitative Research Methods (HL only)

Developmental Psychology (HL only)

Qualitative Research Methods (HL only)

 

Department of Science

MYP:

 

Year 7, 8&9

The aims of the teaching and study of MYP sciences are to encourage and enable students to:

 ▪ understand and appreciate science and its implications

▪ consider science as a human endeavour with benefits and limitations

 ▪ cultivate analytical, inquiring and flexible minds that pose questions, solve problems, construct explanations and judge arguments

▪ develop skills to design and perform investigations, evaluate evidence and reach conclusions

▪ build an awareness of the need to effectively collaborate and communicate

▪ apply language skills and knowledge in a variety of real-life contexts

▪ develop sensitivity towards the living and the non-living environments

▪ reflect on learning experiences and make informed choices

Year 10 & 11

Students will have option to study all 3 disciplines of Science and Integrated Science program.

Biology

  1. Cells
  2. Organisms
  3. Processes
  4. Metabolism
  5. Evolution
  6. Interactions with environment
  7. Interactions with organisms
  8. Human interactions with environments

Chemistry

  1. Periodic Table 
  2. Organic Chemistry
  3. The Atmosphere 
  4. Matter 
  5. Pure and impure substances
  6. Bonding
  7. Types of chemical reactions

Physics

  1. Movement and position
  2. Forces
  3. Electricity
  4. Energy transfers
  5. Work and power
  6. Astronomy
  7. Waves
  8. Magnetism
  9. Nuclear Physics

Integrated

  1. Atoms
  2. Bonding
  3. Cells
  4. Cycles
  5. Electromagnetism
  6. Evolution
  7. Forces
  8. Fuels
  9. Interactions between organisms
  10. Matter
  11. Metabolism
  12. Organisms
  13. Period table
  14. Systems
  15. Waves

DP

Year 12

Year 13

The Diploma Programme Biology, Chemistry and Physics courses include the essential principles of the subject but also, through selection of an option, allow teachers some flexibility to tailor the course to meet the needs of their students. The course is available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study a Science as their major subject in higher education and those who do not.  

Students in Year 12 have 4 Science course options;

Biology

Course content includes;

Core

1. Cell biology

2. Molecular biology

3. Genetics

4. Ecology

5. Evolution and biodiversity

6. Human physiology

Additional higher level (AHL)

7. Nucleic acids

8. Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis

9. Plant biology

10. Genetics and evolution

11.  Animal physiology

Option

A. Neurobiology and behaviour

B. Biotechnology and bioinformatics

C. Ecology and conservation

D. Human physiology

Chemistry

Course content includes;

Core

  1. Stoichiometric relationships
  2. Atomic structure
  3. Periodicity
  4. Chemical bonding and structure
  5. Energetics/thermochemistry
  6. Chemical kinetics
  7. Equilibrium
  8. Acids and bases
  9. Redox processes
  10. Organic chemistry
  11. Measurement and data processing

Additional higher level (AHL)

  1. Atomic structure
  2.  The periodic table—the transition metals
  3. Chemical bonding and structure
  4. Energetics/thermochemistry
  5. Chemical kinetics
  6. Equilibrium
  7. Acids and bases
  8. Redox processes
  9. Organic chemistry
  10. Measurement and analysis

Option

A. Materials

B. Biochemistry

C. Energy

D. Medicinal chemistry

Physics

Core

Course content includes;

1. Measurements and uncertainties

2. Mechanics

3. Thermal physics

4. Waves

5. Electricity and magnetism

6. Circular motion and gravitation

7. Atomic, nuclear and particle physics

8. Energy production

Additional higher level (AHL)

9.  Wave phenomena

10.  Fields

11.  Electromagnetic induction

12.  Quantum and nuclear physics

Option

A.  Relativity

B.  Engineering physics

C.  Imaging

D.  Astrophysics

Environmental Systems & Societies

Environmental Systems and Societies takes on a very important aspect of trying to identify how we (the human animal) affect the environment and also how the environment affects us.

ESS is an interdisciplinary group 3 and 4 course that is offered only at standard level (SL). As an interdisciplinary course, ESS is designed to combine the methodology, techniques and knowledge associated with group 4 (sciences) with those associated with group 3 (individuals and societies).To examine these inter-relationships we will look through economic, historical, cultural, socio-political and scientific lenses to provide a rounded view of environmental issues. As a result of studying this course, you will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world and have philosophical discussion about the impacts.

Assessment overview

Middle Years Programme Science

MYP is assessed by 4 criteria;

A: Knowledge and understanding.

i. explain scientific knowledge

ii. apply scientific knowledge and understanding to solve problems set in familiar and unfamiliar situations

iii. analyse and evaluate information to make scientifically supported judgments.

B: Inquiring and designing.

i. explain a problem or question to be tested by a scientific investigation

ii. formulate a testable hypothesis and explain it using scientific reasoning

iii. explain how to manipulate the variables, and explain how data will be collected

iv. design scientific investigations.

C: Processing and evaluating

i. present collected and transformed data

ii. interpret data and explain results using scientific reasoning

iii. evaluate the validity of a hypothesis based on the outcome of the scientific investigation

iv. evaluate the validity of the method

v. explain improvements or extensions to the method.

D: Reflecting on the impacts of Science

i. explain the ways in which science is applied and used to address a specific problem or issue

ii. discuss and evaluate the various implications of using science and its application to solve a specific problem or issue

iii. apply scientific language effectively

iv. document the work of others and sources of information used.

Students will be awarded a level out of 8 for each criterion assessed. This will accumulate to mark out of 32, which then corresponds to a level from 1-8.

In Year 11, students will sit an e Assessment which assesses all 4 criteria.

 

Subject

Criteria assessed

Duration

Number of marks

available

Biology

A,B,C&D

60 minutes

120

Chemistry

A,B,C&D

60 minutes

120

Physics

A,B,C&D

60 minutes

120

Integrated

A,B,C&D

60 minutes

120

Diploma Programme

Biology, Chemistry and Physics  are assessed by the following;

 

Standard level

Higher level

Paper 1

20%

Multiple choice questions

20%

Multiple choice questions

Paper 2

40%

Short-answer and extended-response questions

36%

Short-answer and extended-response questions

Paper 3

20%

Short-answer and extended-response questions, included data base and option topic questions

24%

Short-answer and extended-response questions, included data base and option topic questions

Internal Assessment

20%

 

20%

 

Environmental Systems and Societies is assessed as outlined below;

Paper 1

25%

Case study

Paper 2

50%

Section A: Short answer questions

Section B: Two essays from a choice of four

Internal Assessment

25%

 

Internal Assessments

The internal assessment task will be one scientific investigation taking about 10 hours and the write-up should be about 6 to 12 pages long.

The practical investigation, with generic criteria, will allow a wide range of practical activities satisfying the varying needs of biology, chemistry and physics. The investigation addresses many of the learner profile attributes well.

Some of the possible tasks include:

  • Hands-on laboratory investigation
  • Using a spreadsheet for analysis and modelling
  • Extracting data from a database and analysing it graphically
  • Producing a hybrid of spreadsheet/database work with a traditional hands-on investigation
  • Using a simulation provided it is interactive and open-ended.

Some tasks may consist of relevant and appropriate qualitative work combined with quantitative work.

Group 4 Project

The group 4 project is a collaborative activity where students from different group 4 subjects work together on a scientific or technological topic, allowing for concepts and perceptions from across the disciplines to be shared in line with aim 10—that is, to “develop an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge”. The project can be practically or theoretically based. Collaboration between schools in different regions is encouraged.

The group 4 project allows students to appreciate the environmental, social and ethical implications of science and technology. It may also allow them to understand the limitations of scientific study, for example, the shortage of appropriate data and/or the lack of resources. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary cooperation and the processes involved in scientific investigation, rather than the products of such investigation.

Useful Links

MYP

http://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/science/

DP

http://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/sciences/chemistry/

http://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/sciences/physics/

http://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/sciences/biology/

http://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/sciences/environmental-systems-and-societies/

https://www.thinkib.net/biology

https://www.thinkib.net/chemistry

https://www.thinkib.net/physics

UAE Social Studies and Moral Education

There are two important subjects that the government has introduced since 2016; UAE Social Studies and in September 2017 the Moral Education Programme. We deliver these subjects in a multi-strand approach that is integrated across all aspects of the curriculum and school life. These timetabled lessons are delivered to all students.

UAE Social Studies is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge, skills and understanding in history, geography and civics, which emphasize the links and relationships between diverse groups, people, science and society. Students will contribute, as responsible citizens and residents of the UAE, to the building of a cohesive society that is inclusive of all, while preserving the UAE culture, heritage and traditions.

Knowledge- The Social Studies “Domains” are Knowledge (National Education, History, Geography, Economics, Sociology).

Weekly lessons in Social Studies with tutors address the National Education domain of the framework. Here students will study such topics as the Formation of the UAE, the role of the founding fathers, and other aspects of the history of the UAE. In addition we study the culture of the Arabic states as well as home countries of EISM students; this includes looking at sports, trades, lives of famous citizens, as well as the morality and principals that our countries embrace and celebrate.

The other Knowledge domains of History, Geography, Economics, Sociology) are studied across the curriculum. For instance in maths lessons students may study the impact of migration on the population of Dubai. Similarly, Geography lessons use the example of Dubai when covering populations and the “push/pull” model of economic migration.

Literacy and Communication- are assessed during the weekly Social Studies lessons. Students develop skills such as examining evidence, collation of data, report writing, and presentation technique.

 

Moral Education (MEP) The MEP framework is new for the 2017-2018 academic year. All students in years 7-10 are required by the KHDA to study MEP and will assess their progress; formal assessment procedures will be introduced by KHDA for the year 2018-2019.

The 4 Objectives of the Moral Education Programme are:

• To build character- resilience, discipline, work ethic, life and adult skills

• Instill Ethical Outlook- teach values such as honesty, tolerance, dignity, humility

• Foster community- enable students to become engaged members of their community

• Endear culture- to value the wealth of UAE culture and all other world cultures

The MEP programme is organized into 4 Pillars

• Character and Morality

• The Individual and the Community

• Civic Studies

• Cultural Studies

The pillars are in unit titles (66 in total across the 10 years) with 5-6 unit titles per year group.

Students study the Units in timetabled lessons but also in all curriculum areas. The MEP programme is mapped extensively across the curriculum and all academic subjects deliver lessons throughout the year addressing the core messages of the programme. This ensures that our school ethos is consistent with the key objectives and core principles of the MEP.

We also ensure that students have the opportunity to explore MEP pillars through other routes:

• Whole school assemblies are all centred around an MEP theme

• Student speakers at assemblies addressing MEP themes

• Year assemblies • Service and Action projects

• Whole school events such as our Annual Multi-Cultural Iftar, International Day

CAS

In my capacity as the CAS coordinator, I enjoyed the experience of interacting with students closely outside of the classroom environment. It has been a personal journey of self-discovery and hope to inculcate in students the same.

Our school offers a strong IB CAS program that includes participation in MUN events around the world and many service opportunities like Dubai Cares, Once upon a dream. The emphasis in CAS is on helping students to develop their own identities in accordance with the ethical principles embodied in the IB mission statement and the IB learner profile. Possibly, more than any other component in the Diploma programme. CAS contributes to the IB’s mission to create a better world. This programme encourages students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Some of EISM’s best events include the PINK DAY, The Pink Walkathon, Barbecue event which was done to raise funds for Mauritius , EISMUN, F1 in schools, Dubai Marathon, World scholar’s cup etc.

Students who have been actively involved in the CAS program need special mention. Sanaiya who rallied her team to organize the Barbecue event, Deveena Sood, Iqra, Hiba, Vivek, Pranav and the pink team for their dedicated efforts in organizing the Pink walkathon , Devina Luthra, Vanya and their team for the Valentine’s Day event is worthy of mention. Stages that are set up during these events were efficiently managed by Armin, Oliver and Emmanuel. Vishal and his MUN team who run the EISMUN conference have set an example to the juniors. Miriam and Nurul successfully completed the Mauritius Donations with their untiring efforts in campaigning for the cause by collecting clothes, books and toys.

The much awaited Mauritius trip by our CAS students was both exciting for the students who developed empathy and compassion for the people in need. We have gone from one to three projects and have made a real difference to the community. Work has ranged from digging new drains, making concrete play areas, painting the inside and outside of the school; building fences and create a better environment for the students to work in.

CAS is tracked by not only the CAS Coordinator but also the Form Tutors. They make sure that the information uploaded by students on managebac is relevant and updated on a regular basis.

I hope that all CAS students embrace their own cultures and are open and responsive to other cultures and views which will help us to create a better and more peaceful world. They should rise to new challenges to gain as much as possible out of this excellent program.

- MRS Roopa Kannan

CAS Coordinator 12 & 13

Drama

Summary of Drama MYP/IGCSE

Themes covered:

  • Devising from a variety of stimuli
  • Physical Theatre
  • Improvisation
  • Using Drama Mediums such as props, lighting and costumes
  • Writing about live theatre performances
  • Group performance with an audience

Assessment:

  • Students are regularly assessed on their practical skills development, knowledge and understanding of theatre practices, written evaluations of devised work, and personal engagement.
  • Once each year, a six hour practical lesson is video recorded in order to be externally assessed. Students must then write about the work they completed in the session under ‘controlled conditions’ within the school. Both the practical work and written work, on these occasions, make up 60% of the student’s final grade.
  • Students must write a 2000 word essay about a live theatre performance that they will go to see outside of school.
  • At the end of year 11, students must perform in an extended piece of drama, either devised around a theme, or based on a scripted play text. This is externally assessed and makes up 40% of the final grade for this course.

Why study Drama?

Drama is the making and communicating of meaning involving performers and audiences, engaging in a suspension of disbelief. It provides a medium for personal exploration, social criticism, celebration and entertainment. It is explored through the dimensions of Forming, Presenting, and Responding.

Drama helps pupils to explore, shape and communicate their sense of identity and understanding of the world, while providing opportunities to develop self-confidence and adaptability. It provides students with a range of skills transferable to a variety of pathways. Now and in the future, drama supports workers who are innovative thinkers, adept communicators and excellent team players.

 Take Action Take Drama

English

Aims of Department

The High School English Department at EISM aims to provide students with the analytical and creative tools necessary for empowered language use and access. The mastery of reading, writing and analysis of English are skills that will enable students to maximise their academic potential across all subject areas while also enabling them to explore and comprehend events, historical periods, places, relationships, customs and cultures through the written word. In this age of digital communication and surrounded by the omnipresent power of the media, the EISM High School English Department encourages students to consider language critically while using it effectively and purposefully. Through this kind of study, students will also develop an appreciation for various literary genres and text-types.

Overview of the curriculum: MYP and DP

In the MYP students will study various poems, novels, films and dramas, developing their appreciation for and understanding of myriad literary forms. They will also consider the language of media and learn how to consider language with critical awareness. Years 7-9 develop general language skills, while years 10 and 11 will prepare students for their final MYP examination comprising of essays and analyses of various pieces of literature and texts. These examinations will be considered in light of one of the Global Contexts, and students will be guided to access texts with the prescribed context in mind. Students will be assessed according to MYP criteria (analysis, production, organisation and language). Texts studied include “River Boy” by Tim Bowler, “Holes” by Louis Sachar and “Unique” by Alison Allen-Grey.

In the DP, students studying Language and Literature will study internationally acclaimed pieces of literature and various text-types. The two-year course is divided into 4 parts: Language in Cultural Context, Language and Mass Communication, and two Literature components, one consisting of poetry and the other of novels. For each unit, students are guided in a close analysis of texts and will produce Written Tasks and Further Oral Assessments. The Independent Oral Commentary and written examinations will be based on skills acquired over the course of the 4 parts. Authors studied include William Shakespeare, Dennis Brutus, Albert Camus and J.M. Coetzee.

Events

The High School English Department throw a week-long birthday party for Shakespeare once a year during which students learn about the Bard and develop an understanding of and appreciation for his work. They also learn about Shakespearean language and this era of history. The week culminates in an explosion of Shakespearean festivities lining the English corridor: a spectacle enjoyed by students and teachers alike.

Humanities

Individuals and Societies Overview (Geography, History, Psychology)

Aims of the Department: In the Individuals and Societies Department, our aim is to develop inquiring, analytical, evaluative and conscious minds, through thought provoking tasks, assessments, debates, and Socratics.  Our classrooms are cooperative learning environments where diplomacy, personal responsibility and leadership naturally thrive. 

Service in Action: Within the Individuals and Societies Department, students are continuously challenged to become involved in the community through links developed in the curriculum.  These opportunities involve Charitable Endeavours, Humanities Week, workshops with SURGE, trips to DEWA and many more. 


Ecoschools and Green Team:  Within the Individuals and Societies department, our staff has embedded components for the development of the Ecoschools initiative and the Green Team.  Student initiation and strong curricular links are vital to both of these components and this is fostered through 2 weekly Ecoschools meetings and 1 weekly Green Team meeting.  Both initiatives involve 7-13 students.  

Curriculum Overview: In Geography, students are given opportunities to explore the natural, social and economic worlds around them, providing an understanding of our world both locally and globally. 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

MYP Year 1

Us, them and Everyone

Key Concept: Identities

Global Context: Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry: How our character is influenced by the places we’re from

 

Water, Water, Everywhere

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: We use our water resources in different ways, which impacts our environments differently

Weather and Climate

Key Concept: Time, place and space

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: weather conditions change depending on location

Those Pesky Mosquitos

Key Concept:   Time, place and space

Global Context:   Orientation in Time and Space

Statement of Inquiry:    Different Diseases can be found in different places around the world

 

 

MYP Year 2

Shake, Rattle and Role

Key Concept:   Change

Global Context:   Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry:    How could we manage the environments around us

What Biome do I call home?

Key Concept:   Systems

Global Context: Globalization and Sustainability

Statement of Inquiry:    How do we survive the extremes?

Tourism

Key Concept: Change

Global Context: Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry: How can tourism be the key to development

MYP Year 3

On the move

Key Concept: Systems

Global Context:   Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry:  we move as a result of push and pull factors

 

Globalization

Key Concept:  Global Interactions 

Global Context:   Globalization and Sustainability

Statement of Inquiry: The impacts of globalization are different depending on the relationship between countries

A Brave New World

Key Concept: Systems

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: Our garbage is making its way around the world

Big City Bright Lights

Key Concept: Change

Global Context: Orientation in Time and Space

Statement of Inquiry: Cities develop in different ways

MYP Year 4

Geographic Pioneers

Key Concept: Time, place and space 

Global Context: Orientation in Time and Space

Statement of Inquiry: Who are the Geographic innovators

 

Hazardous Environments

Key Concept:   Time, place and space

Global Context:   Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry:   Different Locations Deal with Hazards differently 

What happens on our coasts

Key Concept: change

Global Context: Scientific and technical innovation

Statement of Inquiry:Our coasts are dynamic environments

 

How we manage our biomes

Key Concept: systems

Global Context: globalization and sustainability

Statement of Inquiry: we manage our environments differently

Developing our Environments

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context: Personal and Cultural Expression

Statement of Inquiry: Tourism is a curse and a blessing

 

 

MYP Year 5

Resource extraction

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context:   Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry:   We extract resources and manage that process in different ways 

Trade, aid and Exchange

Key Concept:   Systems

Global Context:   Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry:    The global economic environment is changing 

 

Pioneering and Discovery

Key Concept: Time, place and space

Global Context:   Students apply their own 

Statement of Inquiry:   We extract resources and manage that process in different ways 

 

DP Year 1

Paper 1- Populations in Transition

Paper 2- Oceans and their coastal margins

Paper 1- Disparities in Wealth and Development

Paper 2- Oceans and their coastal margins

Paper 1- Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability

Paper 2- Geography of Food and Health

DP Year 2

Paper 1- Patterns in Resource Consumption

Paper 2- Geography of Food and Health/Leisure, sport and Tourism

Paper 2- Leisure, sport and tourism

Paper 3- measuring global interaction, changing spaces, economic interactions and flows, environmental change, sociocultural exchanges, political outcomes, global interactions at the local level

 

Curriculum Overview: In History, students are given opportunities to explore historic perspectives, and attitudes.  This is done through the development of historic skills like bias, source analysis for origin, purpose and limitations, and historiography.

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

MYP Year 1

Us, them and Everyone

Key Concept: Identities

Global Context: Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry: How our character is influenced by the places we’re from

 

Water, Water, Everywhere

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: We use our water resources in different ways

Past Civilizations

Key Concepts: Systems

Global Context: Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry: what makes a civilization civilized?

Medicine Through Time

Key Concept: Change

Global Context: Orientation in Time and Space

Statement of Inquiry: Are we getting better over time?

MYP Year 2

The Road to Expansion

Key Concept: Time, place and space

Global Context: Personal and Cultural Expression

Statement of Inquiry:  Why do empires expand?

 

Who’s In Charge Here?

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context: Globalization and Sustainability

Statement of Inquiry: How does imperialism impact on the colonies?

Better here or there?

Key Concept: Change

Global Context: Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry: some colonies are better off independent

MYP Year 3

Time has changed all wounds

Key Concept: Change

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovations

Statement of Inquiry: Our fight has changed over time

Why fear the red?

Key Concept: Systems

Global Context: Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry: Why do governments change after world conflict

Ethics in Conflict

Key Concept: Global Interactions

Global Context: Orientation in Time and Space

Statement of Inquiry: All is fair in love and war

 

MYP Year 4

Superpowers

Global Context: Globalization and Sustainability

Statement of Inquiry:  Superpowers, empires and super-national alliances and organizations

 

Significant Individuals

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: changes in surgery and in the understanding of disease causes

War & Peacekeeping

Global Context: Globalization and sustainability

Statement of Inquiry: a world is divided by its super powers

 

Independence and National Identity

Global Context: Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry: A divided Union: Civil rights in the USA

Rights and Social Protest

Global Context: Fairness and Development

Statement of Inquiry: A divided Union: Civil rights in the USA

 

Trade, aid and Exchange

Global Context: Globalization and Sustainability

Statement of Inquiry: A World Divided- superpower relations (Marshall Aid)

MYP Year 5

Intellect & Ideologies

Global Context: Identities and Relationships

Statement of Inquiry: dictator development in Germany

 

Pioneers

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Medicine and Health

Global Context: Scientific and Technical Innovation

Statement of Inquiry: our medical knowledge and understanding has expanded since the mid-nineteenth century

 

Daily Life

Global Context: Personal and Cultural Expression

Statement of Inquiry: after the development of a dictatorship in Germany changed household and daily life

Daily Life

Global Context: Personal and Cultural Expression

Statement of Inquiry: after the development of a dictatorship in Germany, social, cultural and artistic developments were effected

DP Year 1

Communism in Crisis 1976-89

Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states

DP Year 1

The Cold War

Aspects of the history of Europe and the Middle East

 

Curriculum Overview: In Psychology, students are given opportunities to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied.  This allows students a greater understanding of themselves and human behaviour.  This is done through the study of biological, cognitive, and sociocultural influences on behaviour. 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

DP Year 1

Intro to Psychology

Biological Level  of Analysis

Socio-Cultural  Level  of Analysis

Cognitive l Level of Analysis

Internal Assessment

DP Year 2

Abnormal Psychology

Qualitative Research Methods (HL only)

Developmental Psychology (HL only)

Qualitative Research Methods (HL only)

 

Islamic

The teaching of Islamic Education in Emirates International school Meadows is a core course for all Muslim children. Set by the Ministry of Education, it reflects the precepts of Islam and its culture and is delivered with the aim of nurturing students in a broad range of social, educational and emotional skills.
The course is taught throughout the school from Key Stage (KS) One to grade 13.

In our effort to strengthen the Islamic values of EISM, we provide Muslim students with a variety of interactive experiences such as competitions of the Holy Quran, trips and visiting lectures. During the school day, Muslim pupils are highly recommended to attend the congregational prayers led by one of our Islamic Education teachers.

The Islamic studies course is offered to students in both English and Arabic.

All of our Islamic Education teachers are experienced in their field. They have been selected for their high standard of classroom management skills and knowledge of teaching and training techniques. Our teachers have a proven record of success within their specialist area, they draw upon this to contribute to the whole school curriculum to provide integrated and cohesive learning across all disciplines within the school day. Our teachers are derived from a variety of international backgrounds.

THE DEPARTMENT’S ISLAMIC EDUCATION SYLLABUS

EISM’s Islamic Education Syllabus is based on the UAE recommended Curriculum of study and aims to develop in learners the following foundations:

  • An awareness of how spiritual and moral issues (Ihsaan) permeate life experiences and the manner in which these may relate to students own lives, teaching the true meaning of a ‘living Islam’.
  • An understanding of the concepts of commitment (Islam) and faith (Imaan) in a religious tradition.
  • A respect for the diverse range of religious and cultural traditions in the UAE and the wider world, in line with creating tolerant and global citizens.
  • A range of investigative, critical and moral thinking skills to enable them to make informed choices and decisions.

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT

All students partake in a range of end of unit assessments covering: the meaning of Faith, Biographies of the Prophets and Muslim historical figures, Matters of daily ritual worship (Prayer, Charity, Fasting and Hajj), Islamic Ethics and Values and Quran Studies.

The aims of the syllabus are to enable pupils to understand:

  • Beliefs and Values: believing in Allah, matters of life and death, marriage and the family, and religion and community cohesion.
  • The Religious Community: beliefs and values, community and tradition, worship and celebration, and living the Muslim life.

Information Technology

We in the ICT Department at Emirates International School, Meadows, offer a modern, vibrant and interactive approach to learning. We take pride in providing our pupils with up-to-date courses, under excellent guidance and expertise.

Our mission is to ensure that all our learners will leave our school with the ICT knowledge and skills necessary to fully participate in the modern world of work. The annual Tech Fair, for example, provides wonderful opportunities for all our students to innovative and to develop the skills they need to become successful.

The Middle Years Program is followed from Year 7 to Year 11. The assessment tasks during these years allow students to develop solutions to real-world challenges using the design cycle that is used by professional engineers, architects and designers.

Teachers issue different design challenges and students practice and refine these skills:

1. Inquire and Analyze:

Students research and analyze problems through performing extensive customer, competitor and market research (both primary and secondary).

2. Develop Ideas:

Using the information and data gathered in step one, students design potential solutions to the problem. They write and present detailed design specifications.

3. Create the Solution:

Students plan the creation of their chosen solution and follow the plan to create a prototype sufficient for testing and evaluation. Students keep a log along the way of their manufacturing process.

4. Test and Evaluate:

Finally, students design and conduct tests to evaluate their product/digital solution, and objectively evaluate its success. They identify areas where the solution could be improved and, in so doing, learn to iterate and adapt.

Assessment for design in all years programme is criterion-related, based on four equally weighted assessment criteria:

Criterion A

Inquiring and analysing

8 marks

Criterion B

Developing ideas  

8 marks

Criterion C

Creating the solution 

8 marks

Criterion D

Evaluating   

8 marks

Year 12 to 13 students have the option of choosing IB Computer Science Course

Diploma Program computer science students should become aware of how computer scientists work and communicate with each other and with other stakeholders in the successful development and implementation of IT solutions.

It is in this context that the Diploma Program computer science course aims to:

  • provide opportunities for study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students, leading to the development of the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning
  • provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science enabling students to apply these to real world situations.
  • demonstrate initiative in applying thinking skills critically to identify and resolve complex problems
  • engender an awareness of the need for effective collaboration and communication in resolving complex problems
  • develop logical and critical thinking skills
  • develop investigative and problem-solving skills
  • develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of computer science to communicate information confidently and effectively
  • raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with continued developments in IT systems and computer science

Useful links

www.theictclub.com

https://csopedia.wikispaces.com/Suggested+Textbooks

https://www.javatpoint.com/java-tutorial

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/

Learning Support

Learning Support

The Learning Support Department (LSD) is there to support any student who has a special educational need or disability (SEND), which affects their learning and access to the curriculum. At EISM, we are committed to inclusive learning and support all pupils, with varied learning needs.

We implement an Assess, Plan, DO, Review cycle to highlight needs through attainment and direct referrals. Dedicated learning support is provided in both the primary and secondary School. We take a graduated approach to provision which is outlined in our SEND Pathway but is pupil centered.

Referrals for Learning Support come mainly from class teachers, subject leaders and parents. Pupils will be assessed by a member of the team and observed in class. After all the information has been gathered a decision will be made about the need for support. This will involve parents and pupils if they are of sufficient understanding. Confidentiality is paramount to preserve the dignity of all our pupils, but we do share information with staff in order to ensure the student’s needs are met.

The services offered by the learning support department are as follows:

•Assessment, Advice and Monitoring (Parents, Teachers, Pupils)

• Targeted Intervention ( in-class support where possible or withdrawal)

• Use of IT programs to support learning

• Direct in-class support

• Shadows (1-1) support for pupils with significant needs.

• Access arrangements – Extra time/laptop/breaks/scribe/reader in High School

• Counseling ( Careers and Personal )

• Mentors

In addition the Learning Support Department welcome the opportunity to extend advice, details of available services in the community and links to external professionals. We offer coffee, morning and opportunities for parents to meet and discuss the needs of individual, children.

If you have any concerns about your child in school; please feel free to contact us through the school office to make an appointment with us. Please ensure that you ask for either the high school or primary school team .

Denzel Moodley

Head of Inclusion

Mathematics

MYP:

 

  • Year 7
  • Year 8
  • Year 9

In year 7-9 students follow MYP Mathematics for year 1-3.The MYP mathematics framework encompasses

  • Numbers: number sense and systems, fractions, decimals and percentages, indices, radicals, ratio and proportion and sets.
  • Algebra :introduction to Algebra (Investigating Patterns), Further Algebra - Forming and Solving linear and quadratic  Equations, Expansion, Factorization and   equation of Straight line
  • Geometry :Co-ordinate Geometry, Transformations, angles, construction, Shape and space Pythagoras and Tangent Ratios
  • Statistics & Probability: interpreting and drawing graphs, comparing categorical data and calculating probability.
  • Year 10
  • Year 11

In the MYP4-5 , the topics and skills in the framework for mathematics are organized so that students can work at two levels of challenge

Standard Mathematics framework encompasses

Number: Financial mathematics, negative and fractional indices, surds and radicals.

Advanced Algebra: sequences, Functions and inequalities

Geometry: circle theorem, Tangent ratios and bearing

Statistics & Probability: central tendency, Histograms, whisker box, correlations and conditional probability.

Extended mathematics, in which the standard mathematics framework supplemented by additional topics and skills, providing greater breadth and depth as advanced trig, vectors and logs

DP

  • Year 12
  • Year 13

Mathematical studies SL

This course is available only at standard level, and is equivalent in status to mathematics SL, but addresses different needs. It has an emphasis on applications of mathematics, and the largest section is on statistical techniques. It is designed for students with varied mathematical backgrounds and abilities. It offers students opportunities to learn important concepts and techniques and to gain an understanding of a wide variety of mathematical topics. It prepares students to be able to solve problems in a variety of settings, to develop more sophisticated mathematical reasoning and to enhance their critical thinking. The individual project is an extended piece of work based on personal research involving the collection, analysis and evaluation of data. Students taking this course are well prepared for a career in social sciences, humanities, languages or arts. These students may need to utilize the statistics and logical reasoning that they have learned as part of the mathematical studies SL course in their future studies.

Mathematics SL

This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration.

Mathematics HL

This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

Assessment overview

 

 

Useful Links

https://www.myimaths.com/

http://www.mistrymaths.co.uk/

https://corbettmaths.com

https://www.kutasoftware.com/

 

Modern Foreign Languages

The learning of a new language provides valuable educational, social, communicative and literacy skills that lay the foundation for further language studies. A new language is a window open to the world and to other cultures. It helps students develop their interests and curiosity in the similarities and differences between themselves and others. It also helps in extending their communication skills and enhances self-esteem.

Choice of languages

At the Emirates International School – Meadows (EISM), we offer three foreign languages: French and Spanish taught from Year 7 to Year 13. Arabic as an additional language is now part and parcel of MFL Department.Its teaching will follow the same pattern as French and Spanish.

Aims of Department

The Modern Foreign Languages Department is committed to the promotion of languages, focusing on developing linguistic skills and awareness of the countries where French, Spanish and German are spoken.

The teaching that we privilege at EISM is based on a communicative approach. It involves constantly the participation of the students and the use of authentic documents.

We endeavor to ensure that the target language is constantly used in teaching.

General objectives

At the completion of the secondary education, students will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively in a foreign language
  • Read independently easy books, newspapers and magazines in the target language
  • Understand simple or extended conversations between native speakers
  • Write simple/extended paragraphs
  • Understand how other languages work
  • Continue their studies at the university in the target language
  • Understand the culture and civilization of the countries where the language is spoken
  • Develop the understanding of themselves and their own culture
  • Form a sound base of the skills and vocabulary necessary for further study, work and leisure
  • Promote wider learning skills (literacy, analysis, memorizing…)
  • Encourage positive attitudes towards foreign language learning

Overview of Curriculum of Years 7-9

The MYP Language Acquisition course aims to encourage students to:

• gain competence in another language

• develop appreciation for other languages and cultures

• adopt skills for additional language learning

Students are assessed on the MYP criteria:

Criterion A: comprehending spoken and visual text

Criterion B: comprehending written and visual text

Criterion C: communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text

Criterion D: using language in spoken and written form

Students are assessed according to their level of proficiency. The MYP curriculum has established a set of 6 phases which determines the level at which the student is. Each phase contains the four criteria above and the acquisition of relevant skills.

Formative and summative assessment methods are used to determine how much of the learning expectations have been met.

Overview of Curriculum of Years 10 & 11

In MYP Years 4 and 5, students continue learning the same language and are given their final assessments whereby their learning is measured against the achievement charts published by the IB as an international standard.

Overview of Curriculum of Years 12 & 13

Language B – High Level / Standard Level in French, Spanish and German

The programme is spread over 2 years.

In French and Spanish language B, students will develop their language acquisition in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students cover a range of written and spoken material, which will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts (for HL) and which will be related to the specific language speaking communities concerned. They will learn how to communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations, demonstrating linguistic competence and intercultural understanding.  They will also use the language to express their ideas with accuracy and fluency.

In higher levels,students understand and use works of literature written in French and Spanish.They aim at mastering the four skills.

Years 12 and 13   French and Spanish Ab Initio SL

IB/ab initio provides an opportunity for students to study the language at a beginner level for two years at IB Standard Level. Students should have no previous experience with the language or have studied MYP phase 1 or 2.  The ab initio course focuses on the understanding of detailed texts and spoken interaction, using a whole range of the language resources and texts as a stimulus for discussion. Writing skills are also developed. Plenty of opportunities are offered to students to learn more about French and Spanish cultures in this course as well as achieving competencies in comprehension and productive skills.

House Camp - Cultural Quizzes

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